A baby walker gives your child the chance to stand, walk, and move when in the home before they’ve learned how to walk. While there are different types of baby walkers, many have similar aspects, such as included toys and comfortable, padded seats.

If you’ve decided that you want a walker for your child, you have to look at the multiple types on the market and select one that you believe works best for your baby. 

3 Different Types of Baby Walkers

Here are the three general types of baby walkers, although they might sometimes be referred to as different names.

Convertible Walkers

We all love versatile baby products, and a convertible walker is just that. It’s a seated walker that you can change to a sit-to-stand walker as your child gets older and starts to walk independently. Most have toys or an activity center.

Here is our top 10 baby walkers.

The main advantage of buying this type of walker is that you don’t need to buy more than one. You can convert it whenever you want. Once your baby starts to learn how to walk, you can remove the seat and allow your child to learn and practice his new skill.

If you’re looking for a convertible baby walker, take a look at the Kolcraft Tiny Steps Activity Walker. It’s a 2-in-1 convertible design that changes from a seated walker to a walk-behind walker. It has smooth swiveling wheels with skid-resistant pads and an adjustable seat pad. Kolcraft added fun toys for your child, and it even folds flat for storage and travel!

Seated Walkers

You might find these types of seats listed as traditional walkers. Most seated walkers work for kids between 15-26 pounds who sit independently and control their head and neck muscles. Seated walkers have a frame crafted from either plastic or steel and a fabric seat with leg holes. 

This type aims to help your baby get ready for walking, but it’s not ideal to use them for long periods. Most include toys or music stations to occupy your child, but you can find classic seated walkers with large trays for snacks and drinks.

One of the most popular seated walkers is the Joovy Spoon Walker. It’s simple and doesn’t include any toys or extras, but this oversized walker is highly rated in the safety category. You’ll quickly notice that the tray is larger than other brands, and the insert is dishwasher safe. The wide base is a safety feature that stops fingers from being pinched, and Joovy made the seat pad machine washable. We all love that!

Sit to Stand Walkers

Sometimes referred to as activity center walkers, these are good choices if you don’t want the risks associated with sitting your baby inside a walker.

It takes time for your child to master walking and balancing, and that’s where sit to stand walkers come into play. This type has a toy station or interactive center and a bar that your child holds as he pushes the toy, working to maintain his balance. Pushing this type of walker is similar to pushing a shopping cart.

Some brands have detachable toy panels, so your child can play with them on the floor. The toys teach your child about shapes, animals, colors, numbers, and more.

One of the most popular picks in this category is the VTech Sit-to-Stand Learning Walker. It’s colorful, offers a range of activities, and the activity center is detachable. Parents like the price and that it includes so many things for their child to do. There are over 70 songs and sounds.

Final Thoughts

Walkers have come a long way in the last decade. Nowadays, you don’t even need a walker with a seat for your child to practice his new walking skill. If you’re worried about the risks, a sit-to-stand walker can be a great choice, helping your child with balance and coordination. However, the seated and convertible walkers are just as safe if you never leave your child unattended.

Author

Hey, this is Linda. My biggest accomplishment in life is being a mother of four children. Their current ages range from almost ten years old down to 20 months old. I'm passionate about writing parenting articles because I understand so well all of the problems and trials you face as a parent. From breastfeeding woes to budgeting problems and behavior problems, along with everything in between, chances are I've faced it over the last ten years.

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